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Heart Attack (AMI)

A heart attack is when blood vessels that supply blood to the heart are blocked, preventing enough oxygen from getting to the heart. If this occurs, the heart muscle dies or becomes permanently damaged. Your doctor may call this an Acute Myocardial Infarction or AMI.

Signs and symptoms of a heart attack can vary among individuals, especially those with a multiple history of certain diseases. Some common signs and symptoms of a heart attack are:

  • Chest pain 
  • Jaw pain
  • Shoulder pain
  • Feeling of indigestion
  • Sweating
  • Shortness of breath

Please remember, if you have any of these symptoms or a combination; you should call your provider or 911 to take you to the hospital.

Source: hospitalcompare.org

Our Heart Attack Quality Report Card

Percentage of heart attack patients that receive aspirin within 24 hours of arrival to the hospital

Why is this Important? The heart is a muscle that gets oxygen through blood vessels. Sometimes blood clots can block these blood vessels, and the heart can't get enough oxygen. This can cause a heart attack. Chewing an aspirin as soon as symptoms of a heart attack begin may help reduce the severity of the attack. This chart shows the percent of heart attack patients who were given (or took) aspirin within 24 hours of arrival at the hospital.

Source:  hospitalcompare.org

Percentage of heart attack patients that receive aspirin once they are discharged from the hospital. 

Why is this Important? Blood clots can block blood vessels. Aspirin can help prevent blood clots from forming or help dissolve blood clots that have formed. Following a heart attack, continued use of aspirin may help reduce the risk of another heart attack. Aspirin can have side effects like stomach inflammation, bleeding, or allergic reactions. Talk to your health care provider before using aspirin on a regular basis to make sure it's safe for you.

Source:  hospitalcompare.org

Percentage of heart attack patients that received and ACE inhibitor and/or angiotensin receptor blocker medication for Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction (LVSD) of the heart.

Why is this Important? ACE (angiotensin converting enzyme) inhibitors and ARBs (angiotensin receptor blockers) are medicines used to treat patients with heart failure and are particularly beneficial in those patients with heart failure and decreased function of the left side of the heart. Early treatment with ACE inhibitors and ARBs in patients who have heart failure symptoms or decreased heart function after a heart attack can also reduce their risk of death from future heart attacks. ACE inhibitors and ARBs work by limiting the effects of a hormone that narrows blood vessels, and may thus lower blood pressure and reduce the work the heart has to perform. Since the ways in which these two kinds of drugs work are different, your doctor will decide which drug is most appropriate for you. If you have a heart attack and/or heart failure, you should get a prescription for ACE inhibitors or ARBs if you have decreased heart function before you leave the hospital.

Source:  hospitalcompare.org

 
Percentage of heart attack patients that received a beta blocker medication prescription upon discharge from the hospital.

Why is this Important? Beta blockers are a type of medicine that is used to lower blood pressure, treat chest pain (angina) and heart failure, and to help prevent a heart attack. Beta blockers relieve the stress on your heart by slowing the heart rate and reducing the force with which your heart muscles contract to pump blood. They also help keep blood vessels from constricting in your heart, brain, and body. If you have a heart attack, you should get a prescription for a beta blocker before you leave the hospital.

Source:  hospitalcompare.org

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